Headache vs. Heartache

“If we never have headaches through rebuking them, we shall have plenty of heartaches when they grow up.” Charles Haddon Spurgeon, speaking of children and parental discipline

“One-third of people in their 20s move to a new residence every year. Forty percent move back home with their parents at least once. They go through an average of seven jobs in their 20s, more job changes than in any other stretch. Two-thirds spend at least some time living with a romantic partner without being married. And marriage occurs later than ever. The median age at first marriage in the early 1970s, when the baby boomers were young, was 21 for women and 23 for men; by 2009 it had climbed to 26 for women and 28 for men, five years in a little more than a generation.

 We’re in the thick of what one sociologist calls “the changing timetable for adulthood.” Sociologists traditionally define the “transition to adulthood” as marked by five milestones: completing school, leaving home, becoming financially independent, marrying and having a child. In 1960, 77 percent of women and 65 percent of men had, by the time they reached 30, passed all five milestones. Among 30-year-olds in 2000, according to data from the United States Census Bureau, fewer than half of the women and one-third of the men had done so.”    What Is It About 20-Somethings? Nytimes.com

What Spurgeon said is now a reality to so many in our culture. We as a culture have traded our role as parents from ones who equip to those who enable our children to be passive, lazy, and selfish. No wonder many young people have an “entitlement” perception. What we viewed as a helping hand by being a friend to them is really lazing parenting. Many parts of parenting is spelled W.O.R.K.

Charles Haddon Spurgeon (1834-92) was England’s best-known preacher for most of the second half of the nineteenth century. In 1854, just four years after his conversion, Spurgeon, then only 20, became pastor of London’s famed New Park Street Church (formerly pastored by the famous Baptist theologian John Gill). The congregation quickly outgrew their building, moved to Exeter Hall, then to Surrey Music Hall. In these venues Spurgeon frequently preached to audiences numbering more than 10,000—all in the days before electronic amplification.

http://www.spurgeon.org

 

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